Safety Training International

Online OSHA Training & Workplace Safety

How to Use Webinars for Successful Training

Employee training is a task that usually comes under the supervision of managers. Each division, whether accounting, advertising, sales or customer service has needs specific to the service they render for the company. You need training seminars that teach the skills necessary for your employees to become more productive in their jobs, and that help foster collaboration and communication. One delivery option that provides flexibility in training are webinars. Webinars can be your key to developing leadership skills in your workplace.

A training Webinar is an online seminar. You log on at a particular time, and you will get to see a seminar on the Internet. Many training seminars are offered with a telephone number included, so that you can also call in and have an opportunity to interact with the trainer.

Online classes or webinars offer several advantages to in-person presentations. You are not limited to only local speakers for one. Nationally recognized trainers are available because with Internet access you are no longer limited by geography. An Internet presentation can be much more cost effective when you wish to have trainers give a presentation, but they live across the country from your offices and getting them there would make the training too cost prohibitive. Anyone with Internet access can participate in a webinar.

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Many managers appreciate the flexibility that comes with webinar presentations. You can provide a specialized training for a select group of employees, or even individual trainees, or you can train a large group when you use an online training. A computer hooked to a projector and an amplified speaker telephone makes online seminars for large groups a snap. Training in a group setting also has the added benefit of facilitating greater collaboration and communication among employees, an excellent result when teams use the skills learned at the seminar to more effectively function in a small-group dynamic.

Employees who are receiving the training get much more out of a presentation that has been not only presented live, but is also recorded. Most educational experts agree that learning is best accomplished in a circular rather than a linear manner. A student needs to take in a new idea more than once for it to become permanently ingrained. Unlike a live presentation where you see it one time, material can be repeated as many times as desired when it is recorded and available to your employees online. Employees can then learn at their own pace, an added boon to increasing the effectiveness of the delivery method for all employees.

All of the different learner types can be well accommodated through the webinar delivery method. People who learn by listening, watching or doing themselves will have ample opportunity to learn with webinar training.

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December 31, 2008 Posted by | Business, Economy, Education, Health & Safety, OSHA Compliance, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tips for Supervisors: Five Ways to Follow Up on Training

Would you like it if your employees only gave 50% effort or completed half of their tasks?

Well, if you are only scheduling and implementing training sessions for your employees, you are merely employee-trainingdoing half the job. Equally as important as these two steps is the task of following up your training sessions.

Following up involves measuring and evaluating a session’s effectiveness. Doing so will provide you with a benchmark for future sessions as well as give your employees the opportunity to tell you how they would like to change the training subject or format.

Here are five easy steps to follow up your training sessions.

1. At the end of the training session, ask each participant to commit to trying 1-3 new skills. Get the participants to write down the actions and then schedule a follow up meeting to discuss whether theses actions stuck, and why. If you do want to lead this meeting yourself just bring back the original trainer.

2. Shortly after the training, ask each participant to give you a brief summary of the two or three most important points they took away from the training. Consolidate the responses and post them in a popular location for a couple weeks.

If time passes and you see your employees reverting to their old habits, email them their responses along with any more feedback you have received.

small-business3. If appropriate, post facts or statistics related to the training after a session. For example, if your training was on customer service, post the number of sales made per week to show employees how they are improving.

4. A week or two after the training, ask participants how they have changed. If appropriate, post the responses. If participants are saying they haven’t changed, ask why and how the training can be improved next time.

5. Several weeks after a training session, send the participants a quiz related to the training’s content. Post all the responses (but separate the right and wrong answers) and award a prize to the person who does the best. For example, if your training was on speedwriting, ask each participant to write down as many abbreviations they can come up with.

Follow these steps and see the results for yourself. After all, going halfway when it comes to managing your organization’s training only cheats the very employees whose performance you are looking to improve.

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November 25, 2008 Posted by | Business, Economy, Education, Health & Safety, OSHA Compliance, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Maximum Learning – Minimum Investment

How Small Business Can Maximize Training Resources

Fact: Small and medium-sized businesses are forced to operate differently than large businesses due to more limited resources.

Fiction: There is a direct correlation between the amount of those limited resources and the quality of service small and medium-sized businesses are forced to deliver.

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) often need to be creative, innovative and just plain smart whentestimonial-ad3 it comes to using resources – especially when it comes to staff training. While the reasons for requiring skill development are usually the same regardless of a business’ size, how those needs are filled can vary greatly. Whereas large businesses can afford to have their own internal training departments, SME’s often rely on external providers such as school board continuing education departments, association professional development events or private training companies.

There is a reason why large businesses have in-house departments dedicated to performance improvement; staff training requires time, money, customized training content and enough employees to make such a department justifiable.

The fact is, SMEs can be wise when devoting resources to staff training, and even take advantage of their sizes. Here are the Top 5 Ways for SMEs to Maximize Training Resources.

1. Implement and promote a program where senior employees can tutor new employees, thereby eliminating knowledge gaps within your business.

2. Pay for your employees’ membership fees in associations. These organizations often host professional development seminars for their members at very reasonable prices.

3. If you feel your employees need training to improve their performance ask them what they feel they need. This ensures that the training you provide will be as effective as possible.

4. Send an employee to learning opportunities, such as conferences, tradeshows or public courses. The employee can then act as an in-house trainer.

5. Budget for training by setting aside a set amount of money that will be used for training when needed – just like saving up for your first car.

If you feel your employees would be better served by a private training company, do your research. Find an organization that will customize its material for your needs and deliver the training at your office when you need it. The training company should also understand the needs of an SME, so ask for references from companies that are similar to yours.

Fact: If SMEs treat their size as a weakness, it will be a weakness. If SMEs treat their size as a strength and use their resources wisely, they can compete with competitors of all sizes.

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November 24, 2008 Posted by | Business, Economy, Education, Health & Safety, OSHA Compliance, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment