Safety Training International

Online OSHA Training & Workplace Safety

Tips for Supervisors: Five Ways to Follow Up on Training

Would you like it if your employees only gave 50% effort or completed half of their tasks?

Well, if you are only scheduling and implementing training sessions for your employees, you are merely employee-trainingdoing half the job. Equally as important as these two steps is the task of following up your training sessions.

Following up involves measuring and evaluating a session’s effectiveness. Doing so will provide you with a benchmark for future sessions as well as give your employees the opportunity to tell you how they would like to change the training subject or format.

Here are five easy steps to follow up your training sessions.

1. At the end of the training session, ask each participant to commit to trying 1-3 new skills. Get the participants to write down the actions and then schedule a follow up meeting to discuss whether theses actions stuck, and why. If you do want to lead this meeting yourself just bring back the original trainer.

2. Shortly after the training, ask each participant to give you a brief summary of the two or three most important points they took away from the training. Consolidate the responses and post them in a popular location for a couple weeks.

If time passes and you see your employees reverting to their old habits, email them their responses along with any more feedback you have received.

small-business3. If appropriate, post facts or statistics related to the training after a session. For example, if your training was on customer service, post the number of sales made per week to show employees how they are improving.

4. A week or two after the training, ask participants how they have changed. If appropriate, post the responses. If participants are saying they haven’t changed, ask why and how the training can be improved next time.

5. Several weeks after a training session, send the participants a quiz related to the training’s content. Post all the responses (but separate the right and wrong answers) and award a prize to the person who does the best. For example, if your training was on speedwriting, ask each participant to write down as many abbreviations they can come up with.

Follow these steps and see the results for yourself. After all, going halfway when it comes to managing your organization’s training only cheats the very employees whose performance you are looking to improve.

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November 25, 2008 - Posted by | Business, Economy, Education, Health & Safety, OSHA Compliance, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments »

  1. So, open communication is an effective way for between employees and employers to have a good relationships.

    Comment by Karen Davis | November 25, 2008 | Reply

  2. Open communication is an effective way to improve relationships, however one must keep in mind there are variables. Good relationships are not only based on effective communication is also is dependent on personalities and willingness to accept communication from others. I think we can all agree that there are those supervisors who don’t like to hear anyone’s voice but their own. However if you are fortunate enough to be supervised by someone who encourages open communication you can’t really argue the point that this will lead to a better relationship overall.

    Comment by Safety International | November 25, 2008 | Reply


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